Amy L. Brewster, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

Amy L. Brewster, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

I received my bachelor’s degree from The University of Puerto Rico at Cayey, a Ph.D. degree from The University of California at Irvine, and postdoctoral training at Baylor College of Medicine. My pre- and postdoctoral research focused on identifying molecular mechanisms driving neuronal hyperexcitability in experimental models of epilepsy. Currently, I am an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University. In my laboratory I work with a team of enthusiastic graduate and undergraduate students to find and understand how neuroimmune crosstalks may contribute to the underlying causes of epilepsy. In addition to research I enjoy running, baking cakes, and traveling.
Nicole D. Schartz, Graduate Student

Nicole D. Schartz, Graduate Student

Currently I am pursuing a Ph.D. degree in Behavioral Neuroscience. I am interested in elucidating the mechanisms underlying synaptic modifications and behavioral impairments in models of acquired temporal lobe epilepsy. My project focuses on using pharmacogenetic approaches to determine whether the immune complement system plays a role in the synaptic remodeling and in the abnormal social and cognitive behaviors that are seen after prolonged seizures. When I am not in the lab, I enjoy listening to music and going to concerts. I also love to travel and spend time outdoors.
Season K. Wyatt-Johnson, Graduate Student

Season K. Wyatt-Johnson, Graduate Student

Currently I am pursuing a Ph.D. degree in Behavioral Neuroscience. I received my bachelor's degree in Nuclear Engineering from Purdue University in 2015. I changed my path from wanting to study reactors to studying neuroscience after I took Neurobiology of Disease with Dr. Brewster. I was amazed at how much about the brain is still being discovered and I wanted to be a part of that science. My research interests are focused around understanding microglia, the immune cells of the brain, and how microglia are involved in seizures and epilepsy. When I'm not looking at microglia you can usually find me running marathons.
Lauren R. Price, Lab Assistant

Lauren R. Price, Lab Assistant

I graduated from Purdue in December 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in Brain and Behavioral Sciences. I began working in Dr. Brewster’s lab as a junior to complete my Honors College thesis. While I’ve always loved neuroscience, my project made me realize that I wanted to pursue the field of histology. My research interests lie in autoimmune diseases of the brain, specifically multiple sclerosis. I am currently pursuing graduate school to further research this disease. When not in the lab, I like to relax with Netflix or a good book.
Seth A. Herr, Alumni

Seth A. Herr, Alumni

I started working in Brewster’s lab as an undergraduate in the Research-Focused Honors Program. My project examined the role of microglia in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. After graduating in 2016, I joined the Purdue Interdisciplinary Life Science Program, where I am a pre-doctoral student in the Integrative Neuroscience Training Group. Immunotherapy is growing more effective and popular, especially in cancer research where cancer cells are targeted for destruction by the immune system. I’m interested in using immunotherapy strategies such as this to stop the burden of neurodegenerative disorders.